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Elisabeth Stahl on Benchmarking and IT Optimization

Posts Tagged ‘ZFS

Encrypting Everything Really Really Fast, 12 Billion Transactions per Day, at Less Cost !

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Many of us don’t think of it every day but the IBM Mainframe actually supports:

  • 87 percent of all credit card transactions and nearly $8 trillion payments a year.
  • 29 billion ATM transactions each year, worth nearly $5 billion per day.
  • Four billion passenger flights each year.
  • More than 30 billion transactions per day – more than the number of Google searches every day.
  • 68 percent of the world’s production workloads at only six percent of the total IT cost.

And now it’s here. The new IBM Z !!!

With the new z14, IBM takes TRUST to a new level by adding the ability to pervasively encrypt data on the platform. IBM Z pervasive encryption is a data-centric approach to information security — a transparent and consumable approach to enable extensive encryption of data in-flight and at-rest to substantially simplify and reduce the costs of protecting data and achieving compliance mandates.

With the z14 and pervasive encryption, organizations can:

· Encrypt all of the data associated with an application or database on IBM Z, whether at-rest or in-flight.
· Reduce the cost and complexity associated with implementing and maintaining encryption since no changes to the applications themselves are required.
· Protect data without impacting transactional throughput or SLAs.
· Transition from un-encrypted to encrypted databases without disrupting business operations (DB2 and IMS high availability databases).
· Drastically simplify compliance by quickly demonstrating to auditors that all data is protected.

This awesome new system can support > 12 billion encrypted transactions per day on a single system ! It can also encrypt data 18x faster at 5% of the cost of x86-based solutions [1].

IBM Z has been a leader in security with hardened capabilities architected into the hardware, OS and middleware for more than five decades.

Contact the IBM Systems Client Centers for more information or assistance.

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(1) Source: “Pervasive Encryption: A New Paradigm for Protection,” K. R. E. Lind, Chief Systems Engineer, Solitaire Interglobal Ltd., June 30, 2017.

The postings on this site solely reflect the personal views of the author and do not necessarily represent the views, positions, strategies or opinions of IBM or IBM management.

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Written by benchmarkingblog

July 17, 2017 at 11:43 am

Posted in Uncategorized, Z, z14

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Taking the Wind Out of Oracle’s Sails

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I don’t always read the sports pages. But lately, with the US Open, the Olympics win for Japan, and college football, how could I not?

And lo and behold — instead of a splashy ad on the front page of the paper, there was an article this week deep into the sports section — about Oracle.

It appears that the Oracle team in the America’s Cup competition was in the news — not for doing well — but for receiving penalties. The penalties, the harshest in America’s Cup history, were imposed for illegally modifying 45-foot catamarans.

One place where we would like to think that “illegal modifications” are also not tolerated is in benchmarking.

Oracle this week claimed performance and price performance leadership based on the Storage Performance Council SPC-2 benchmark. I’m sure that with this being an industry standard benchmark there were no modifications – but that doesn’t mean that there were not some difficulties with comparisons claimed. Here’s what you need to know:

  • The Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-4 result was just released. The IBM and HP results they compare to are from 2012, a lifetime ago in the benchmarking world.
  • The Oracle storage result used a 2-node cluster and 1.6x the physical capacity of the IBM DS8700 result.(1)
  • A fit for purpose methodology is needed for these storage comparisons – are you running analytics or critical batch processing? Different workloads require different levels of nonfunctional requirements which translate into different types of storage.
  • With storage, it’s essential to compare all the options, including many of the new flash offerings.
  • What is the reliability and support for these storage devices? Instead of just price/performance, make sure you study the real TCO.

 

It matters whether you win or lose. But it also matters how you play the game.

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(1) Results as of September 10, 2013, for more information go to http://www.storageperformance.org/results SPC-2. Results for Oracle ZFS Storage ZS3-4 are 17,244.22 SPC-2 MBPS™, $22.53 SPC-2 Price-Performance. Full results are available at http://www.storageperformance.org/results/benchmark_results_spc2#b00067. Results for IBM DS8870 are 15,423.66 SPC-2 MBPS, $131.21 SPC-2 Price-Performance. Full results are available at http://www.storageperformance.org/results/benchmark_results_spc2#b00062. Results for HP P9500 XP Disk Array are 13,147.87 SPC-2 MBPS, $88.34 SPC-2 Price-Performance. Full results are available at http://www.storageperformance.org/results/benchmark_results_spc2#b00056

SPC Benchmark-1 and SPC Benchmark-2 are trademarks of the Storage Performance Council.

The postings on this site solely reflect the personal views of the author and do not necessarily represent the views, positions, strategies or opinions of IBM or IBM management.

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Written by benchmarkingblog

September 11, 2013 at 3:05 pm

Posted in Oracle, storage

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